Imagine the possibilities..Library and Information Week at the State Library 25-31 May 2015

Behind the Scenes Tours711A 49
Visit the State Library on Tuesday or Thursday next week and find out just a little about the fascinating preservation and conservation work that is so essential to the care of our most precious heritage items. Sessions are free but bookings are essential. 

Your Library Online
Come along on Friday 29th May and learn how to be an effective online researcher to find what you need when looking at the Library catalogue and our online databases and journals. Session is free but bookings are essential.

National Simultaneous Storytime
Join us on Wednesday 27th May to listen to The Brothers Quibble by Aaron Blabey read
at the same time to children around Australia.  All children (with carers) welcome. Storytime is held in the children’s area The Place on the mezzanine level. No Bookings are required.

The Place

The Place

 

Missing Lives

The tragedy of war and separation are powerful realities revealed in a photographic exhibition by award winning British photojournalist, Nick Danziger.

Taken in the aftermath of the conflicts in former Yugoslavia in the 1990s, Missing Lives documents the plight of a handful of families waiting to learn the fate of their loved ones, classified as missing.

Photograph: copyright Nick Danziger. No unathorised use or copying without permission

Photograph: Reproduced with permission. Copyright Nick Danziger. No unauthorised use or copying without permission.

Under international humanitarian law, authorities on all sides of a conflict have a legal duty to take every step to determine the fate of those who are missing and to pass this information on to their families. Almost 20 years after the wars in Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia, and 13 years after the end of conflict in Kosovo, thousands remain unaccounted for.

Based on a book of the same name, this exhibition highlights the tragic consequences of what happens when the rules of war are not followed, but also illustrates the strength and resilience of survivors still searching for their missing friends and relatives.

Photograph: Reproduced with permission. Copyright Nick Danziger. No unauthorised use or copying without permission.

Photograph: Reproduced with permission. Copyright Nick Danziger. No unauthorised use or copying without permission.

Two lunchtime talks will be presented in conjunction with the Missing Lives exhibit.

Missing during war
What happens when people go missing in war? Claire Lawson from the Australian Red Cross reveals the impact left on those waiting for answers, why so many people remain unaccounted for, and how the Red Cross can assist.

Wednesday 27 May, 12.30 – 1:00 (30 mins)
Wednesday 17 June, 12.30 – 1:00 (30 mins)

Missing Lives in on display at the State Library from 20 May – 30 June. For more information visit our website. Missing lives is presented by The Australian Red Cross and is supported by the International Committee of the Red Cross and Lotterywest.  

 

Forget Me Not: Western Australians and WWI

BA718/4 From Basil (Herbert Basil) Abraham to his sister Olive from France 1915.

BA718/4 From Basil (Herbert Basil) Abraham to his sister Olive from France 1915.

This month, many thousands of Western Australians took part in dawn services and parades to mark not just Anzac Day, but the centenary of  Anzac and the Gallipoli landing.   “Mum do we have any Anzacs in our family?” my eight year old daughter asked expectantly in the lead up to Anzac Day.  “Sorry, no Anzacs” I answered.  The fact that her Canadian grandfather flew bombers in WWII, and her Italian grandfather fought Austrians in the Dolomites in WWI was of no consolation.  “How come all the other kids at school have a Gallipoli hero in their families.”

I think I may have asked my own mother the same question decades ago when I was a kid. I don’t remember Anzac Day being as big a deal when I was young, but I do understand my daughter’s disappointment at feeling somehow left out of this important and sacred occasion as others proudly parade their family stories, photos and medals.  Decades on, and many millions of non-British migrants later, I wonder how many  other Australians with no family link to Anzac wonder about their place in a nation that holds the Anzac legend so dear.

Historians, journalists, film makers and writers have long argued over what ANZAC means and has meant to Australians.  Debates rage hotter than ever between those who see WWI as the crucible of nationhood fought for a high and noble purpose, and those who argue our nation was forged in peacetime, not on the battlefield of a dreadful, futile war.   History is never cut and dried, and understanding that there are different perspectives on our involvement in WWI doesn’t denigrate Anzac or diminish respect for those who have served Australia.    Now, with the 100th anniversary of Gallipoli behind us, and with three more years of the Centenary of WWI ahead, it’s a good time for a deeper contemplation of what Gallipoli means to Australians. We owe it to our servicemen and women to reflect on why and how they fought, and to understand the impact of their service on civilian life in Western Australia during and after the Great War.

If you want to read what others have written about Australia’s involvement in the Great War, a good place to start is our WWI subject guide to materials held in the State Library of Western Australia.

A quick overview of what some call the Anzac ‘history wars’ is also available online:

Anzac Day to VP: arguments and interpretations, Joan Beaumont.

Political Rhetoric Makes a Parody of Remembrance, Bruce Scates.

The Past is Not Sacred, Peter Cochrane.

Assault on Anzac, Mervyn Bendle

Letting go of Anzac  Henry Reynolds and Marilyn Lake.

If you’re looking for a more personal and immediate perspective on the Great War, the State Library holds a wealth of soldier letters, diaries, postcards and photographs.  Whatever your opinion on the justness or futility of the war, you can’t help but be moved by the first-hand accounts of bravery and fear, drudgery and humour, longing and loss.

These letters, diaries and photographs are so vital to understanding the human perspective of war.  For those of us with no personal connection to the Anzacs, we are grateful to those people who have generously shared their family’s WWI stories with the wider Western Australian public by depositing their treasured diaries, letters or photographs with the State Library of Western Australia.

Among the more recent WWI treasures to come into the State Library’s collections is the diary of Beresford Everett Bardwell.  Born in Melbourne about 1890, Bardwell moved to Western Australia with his family and grew up in Geraldton working as a Solicitor’s Clerk before enlisting.  He started out as a private in the 11th Battalion, and was among the 704 soldiers pictured in the well known photograph of the Battalion taken at the Great Pyramid of Giza at Cheops in January 1915.  He took part in the Gallipoli landings and fought in the trenches until August 1915 when a shrapnel wound to the thigh saw him evacuated and sent back to Egypt.  After convalescing, he was promoted to Captain and returned to active service in 1916 as part of the 51st Battalion in France, where he fought until the end of the War in 1919.

SLWA BA 780/37 Captain Bardwell seated on ground , 1917

SLWA BA 780/37 Captain Bardwell seated on ground , 1917

After the War, Bardwell returned to Western Australia and worked with his brother, Bernard, in the pearling industry and went on to become the Broome Harbour Master.  He married in 1921 and had two children and six grandchildren before he died in 1961, aged 71.

His diary was loaned to the State Library for copying by grandson John Bardwell. Spurred by the WA Genealogical Society’s wonderful project to identify the soldiers in the famous photograph of the 11th Battalion at Giza, John came forward to identify his grandfather.  He thought we might also be interested in a copy of his grandfather’s war diary.  The generosity of individuals and families like the Bardwell’s means that future generations of Western Australians can share this first-hand account of Gallipoli.

Bardwell’s diary doesn’t cover his entire war service, just the period from 11 April to 16 September 1915 after his wounding at Gallipoli and recuperation in an army hospital in Egypt.  Before you even begin reading the 66 pages of diary entries, the script itself gives clues as to how war can change men. At the start, the diary entries are legible and dated neatly.  After months of fighting in the hills and trenches of Gallipoli, the calligraphy is scratchier, reflecting the hardship and chaos around him.   The script also mirrors the tone of the diary, which begins in a relatively light hearted fashion prior to the landings, and then quickly darkens.

Diary

You can read the whole diary in Bardwell’s original script via our State Library Catalogue here.

We will also be a adding an easier to read copy transcribed by volunteers from the WA Genealogical Society.   Here are just a few snippets from the diary transcript…

Sunday 11 April 1915….Great amusement was caused today when one of the boats came back from the shore with some of our men aboard among whom were two who had got hold of some Koniak and got rather drunk.  While coming alongside one of them first threw his hat overboard and then picked up his rifle and before anyone could stop him threw it after the hat, of course it was lost.  Of course they could not come up the rope ladders, so when the Colonel heard about it he ordered them to be securely bound and hauled up by the winch. As horses were being loaded at the time a horse sling was made use of. The first man, the worst of the two, was swung up into the air where he looked quite happy and caused a lot of amusement among the onlookers, then was lowered onto the deck and taken charge of to await his trial.

17 April 1915…The harbour is now very full and we hear there are any amount of others outside. It is also said that we are going to be here a week or so yet. One has to develop a great deal of patience these days on account of our long waits. Some of the fellows wonder why we don’t rush right into things. They don’t seem to realize that we have been waiting for a concentration of very large forces here and that the heads have to await favourable times to begin operations…Once they are into it I reckon there will be a very large percentage who would rather be back on board ship again.

20th April 1915…Went ashore today and took part in a rather severe but short route march over the hills down onto the beach on the other side where we had lunch. Everywhere one can now notice the arrival of spring.  One crop we passed over was simply beautiful, although only a foot high it was a beautiful shade of green and all through it bright red poppies thrust their heads above the carpet of green.

25th April 1915….We got close to shore near daybreak + soon after heard Turks open fire on first half of Brigade as they were landing + then we heard our men cheering as they charged up hill + took a trench. We landed immediately after in life boats amid a perfect hail of lead, a great many of our men being hit in boats  + on shore. As soon as we got ashore we flung off our packs and lay down on the beach. There seemed to be a hopeless mixture of Coys and Battalion’s boats from different ships landing at same place. Several boats landed further round to the left upon which machine guns played cutting up the men dreadfully. In the meantime the  ½ B’gde had driven the enemy immediately in front well back over the hills, and what hills! rising very steeply up from the shore to a height of some 300 feet.

28th April…Got word 3rd B’gde reorganising on beach, boiled my first dixy of tea, alongside a dead fellow this morning, since Saturday night. Then went onto beach where I joined what were there of Batn.

2 May… Heard on Friday there were 176 killed 900 odd wounded + 700 odd missing of whom many will yet turn up + remainder may be put down as dead or prisoners…

9 May…Went out in front of trenches one day while some of our men buried dead Turks, they were not pleasant sights, especially one Australian who was wholly unrecognizable  and was an awful sight.  Puckle had previously taken a piece of poetry from his pocket written most likely by his sweetheart, but as his identity disk had been removed he could not be recognised. The stench was awful…

 13 May…  Tuesday morning Reg Clark of Geraldton, a really fine chap who was boiling tea for trenches when a shrapnel burst , a pellet of which went through his brain from which he soon died. The same shell also hit Greenwood passing through thigh and then through foot, all three of “D” Coy, 2 former of own Platoon and my section. Later in day, we of Geraldton, his friends held his burial service which was read by Louch.

If you are interested in reading more of Bardwell’s diary, or other WWI diaries and letters, including the papers of the Geraldton soldier Thomas Louch mentioned in Bardwell’s diary entry, please visit the WWI collection highlights page on our website.

We’re seeking your support to digitise more WWI material like Bardwell’s diary through our ‘On the Homefront’ appeal.

Upcoming Seminars

The Family History Subject Specialists will be out and about over the next two weeks. We will be giving talks at Warnbro and Fremantle Public Libraries.

Taking the census. From a sketch by Thomas Worth, Harpers Weekly 19 Nov 1870

Taking the census. From a sketch by Thomas Worth, Harpers Weekly 19 Nov 1870

Warnbro – Black and White and Read all Over
One of the most exciting developments for family history researchers is the rapidly expanding collection of digitised newspapers available. For family historians who think that they have reached the limits of what they can reasonably expect to discover about their forebears, think again!
The State Library subscribes to digitised historic newspaper archives from Australia, the United Kingdom, Ireland and the United States. These are all available to search from home to members of the State Library.
Warnbro Community Library, Swallowtail Parade, Warnbro
Wednesday 6th May 10.30am – 12pm
B
ookings essential: 9528 8577
wclcontact@rockingham.wa.gov.au

State Library family history bookmarks

State Library family history bookmarks

Fremantle – Catalogue conundrums and website whimsies
Have you ever struggled to find what you are looking for in our catalogue or website? This talk introduces some of the family history resources we have at the State Library and how to find them. Whether it is our blog, Facebook page, subject guides, bookmarks, eresources, catalogued items or private archives – you are sure to discover resources you were not aware of. See some of the wonderful items we have digitised and learn a few tricks along the way.
Fremantle  City Library, 8 William Street, Fremantle
Tuesday 12 May 2.30pm – 4pm
Bookings essential: 9432 9739
lhc@fremantle.wa.gov.au

 

Photo booth: picture yourself in history

Put yourself in the picture! Visit our green screen photo booth to have your photo taken in an iconic Western Australian scene.

When: Tuesday 5 May – Thursday 7 May & Saturday 9 May  I   1.30pm – 3.30pm,
Where:  State Library ground floor

20150430_111923_474_IMG_9550_keyedPicture yourself in history is presented as part of the National Trust Heritage Festival: Conflict and Compassion

Tuesday 5 May 1.30 – 3.30pm 
“Love not war brings peace”
Travel back in time to attend an Anti Vietnam war protest in 1972.

May Day Anti-Vietnam War protest march from Stirling Street to Perth Foreshore, March 1972. 380344PD, State Library of Western Australia pictorial collection

May Day Anti-Vietnam War protest march from Stirling Street to Perth Foreshore, March 1972. 380344PD, State Library of Western Australia pictorial collection

Wednesday 6 May 1.30 – 3.30pm 
Strike a pose with the chorus girls of the Princess Picture Theatre at Cottesloe beach

Chorus girls of regular nightly stage show at Princess Picture Theatre, Fremantle, at Cottesloe Beach, 1929, 041367PD, State Library if Western Australia pictorial collection

Chorus girls of regular nightly stage show at Princess Picture Theatre, Fremantle, at Cottesloe Beach, 1929, 041367PD, State Library of Western Australia pictorial collection

Thursday 7 May 1.30 – 3.30pm
Be a part of the crowd of 20 000 people who watched legendary aviator Bert Hinkler fly above Loton Park, Perth Oval in 1928.

000614D

Crowd of people watch the sky as Bert Hinkler arrives in Perth, 1 April 1928, 000614D, State Library of Western Australia pictorial collection

Saturday 9 May 1.30 – 3.30pm 
Be there when Perth streets lit up for Armistice Day 11 November 1918, to mark the end of fighting on the Western Front.

Peace Night illuminations in Perth, 19 July 1919, 112279PD, State Library of Western Australia pictorial collection

Peace Night illuminations in Perth, 19 July 1919, 112279PD, State Library of Western Australia pictorial collection

Saturday 9 May 1.30 – 3.30pm 
Train hard with the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force of 1943.

WAAAF training, Fremantle, 2 October 1943, 047149PD , State Library of Western Australia pictorial collection

WAAAF training, Fremantle, 2 October 1943, 047149PD , State Library of Western Australia pictorial collection

  • Visit our website for more information
  • Free family friendly event
  • Photos from the photo booth will available for viewing on the State Library of Western Australia Flickr account. View some of the photographs from last year’s photo booth.
  • All venues at the State Library are wheel chair accessible.

Sailing great Jon Sanders visits State Library

Yachting legend Jon Sanders world record for sailing around the world three times solo is still unbroken.  His Perie Banou log book is on display now at State Library of Western Australia. 

In 1988 Sanders changed global yachting history when he broke the Guinness World Record for the longest distance ever sailed continuously by a vessel after travelling 658 days, 21 hours and 18 minutes at sea.

Evan Collins, Jon Sanders arrives at Fremantle on the Parry Endevour after his triple circumnavigation of the world, 13 March 1988, 135227PD – 125229PD, State Library of Western Australia pictorial collection.

Evan Collins, Jon Sanders arrives at Fremantle on the Parry Endevour after his triple circumnavigation of the world, 13 March 1988, 135227PD,  State Library of Western Australia pictorial collection.

Following his ninth circumnavigation of the world, the Perth born sailor has returned to Perth and recently visited Sailing on the Swan at the State Library.

The exhibition features original material including one of Sanders sailing log books from his double circumnavigation of the world aboard Perie Banou. The log records the ships position, current speeds, wind directions, and bearings. The page displayed shows notes from Perie Banou’s sail through the treacherous currents and hazardous winds in Southern Chile around Cape Horne.

Roger Garwood, Jon Sanders returns to Royal Perth Yacht Club on 31 October 1982 after his double circumnavigation of the world on Perie Banou, 1982, 296493PD, State Library of Western Australia pictorial collection

Roger Garwood, Jon Sanders returns to Royal Perth Yacht Club on 31 October 1982 after his double circumnavigation of the world on Perie Banou, 1982, 296493PD, State Library of Western Australia pictorial collection.

Exhibition highlights include a 1988 photograph of Sanders on Parry Endevour. The photograph was taken two days before he broke the world record for triple circumnavigation of the world.  Upon viewing the photo in the exhibition Sanders recalled that at the time strong winds forced a closure of Perth airport.

Jon Sanders pictured with photograph of Parry Endevour at Cape Leeuwin.

Jon Sanders pictured with photograph of Parry Endevour at Cape Leeuwin.

Interested in checking yacht log entries surrounding the Fauklands conflict in 1982,  Sanders reacquainted himself with the remainder of his 1979-1982 Perie Banou logbooks, held in the State Library heritage collections (ACC3229A). He recalled an entry where BBC Argentina “warned shipping to stay out of the 200 mile maritime zone around Fauklands”. The ten week war in 1982 between Argentina and the United Kingdom was over two British territories in the South Atlantic.

Jon Sanders with the Perie Banou logbooks

Jon Sanders with the Perie Banou logbooks

Sailing on the Swan is presented by the Royal Perth Yacht Club. The exhibition is on display at the State Library of Western Australia Ground Floor Gallery until May 3. Open during library hours.

Another significant early photograph album digitised by the Library

In September 2014 I wrote a blog post about an album of photographs taken by Alfred Hawes Stone during the 1860s which had been digitised by the State Library.

Tim Croft, who is a direct descendant of Alfred Stone, read the post and showed the online photographs to his mother, Dorothy. Dorothy Croft is Alfred Stone’s great-granddaughter and the pair was impressed with the quality of digitisation and the way the photographs had been described and presented. The family has another album of photographs taken by Alfred Stone which had been lent to the Library for copying back in 1976. Of course, there have been huge advances in technology since then. In light of this,Tim and his mother decided to offer the Library the chance to copy their album – this time in a digital format.

Tim Croft with the Stone album of photographs (6923B)

Alfred Hawes Stone’s great great grandson,Tim Croft with the Stone album of photographs (6923B) in the Library’s Preservation Services workroom

Tim Croft, Les Tucker and Tricia Fairweather

Left to right: Tim Croft and State Library staff Les Tucker and Tricia Fairweather. Les photographed the album and Tricia is one of the subject specialists in family history

The Collection of photographs taken by A.H. Stone during the 1860s and featuring people, buildings and scenes in Perth is now available for viewing online. It contains 204 photographs from the 1860s featuring members of the Stone family and their friends as well as numerous buildings in and around Perth. Alfred Stone was a very keen photographer and it is wonderful that so many of his photographs have survived and are now able to be shared online. The State Library acknowledges the generosity of the Croft family in sharing their family treasure with us.

The individual photographs are yet to be catalogued but you can browse through the album using the link above and a small sample of images is included below.

Alfred Hawes Stone, October 1861 (6923B/119) appears on page 49 of the album

Alfred Hawes Stone, October 1861 (6923B/119) – appears on page 49 of the album

Alfred Stone's home Alpha Cottage, St George's Terrace, Perth (6923B/181) appears on page 86 of the album

Alfred Stone’s home Alpha Cottage, St George’s Terrace, Perth (6923B/181) – appears on page 86 of the album

Corner of Murray and Irwin Streets, Perth taken from Perth Public Hospital (6923B/62) appears on page 26 of the album

Corner of Murray and Irwin Streets, Perth taken from Perth Public Hospital (6923B/62) – appears on page 26 of the album

Aboriginal man, Daakin (6923B/26) appears on page 12 of the album

Aboriginal man, Daakin (6923B/26) – appears on page 12 of the album

Mr and Mrs R.D. Hardey, nee Maria Jemima Stone (6923B/146) appears on page 60 of the album

Mr and Mrs R.D. Hardey, nee Maria Jemima Stone (6923B/146) – appears on page 60 of the album

View of St George's Terrace to Perth Boys' School taken from William Street. J. Dyer's store is in the foreground (6923B/106) - appears on page 44 of the album

View of St George’s Terrace to Perth Boys’ School taken from William Street. J. Dyer’s store is in the foreground (6923B/106) – appears on page 44 of the album

Miss Elizabeth Louisa Hardey, September 1862 (6923B/143) - appears on page 59 of the album

Miss Elizabeth Louisa Hardey, September 1862 (6923B/143) – appears on page 59 of the album

Government House and the WA Volunteers after the presentation of Commissions to the Officers by Governor J.S. Hampton, December 1863 (6923B/196) - appears on page 96 of the album

Government House and the Western Australian Volunteers after the presentation of Commissions to the Officers by Governor J.S. Hampton, December 1863 (6923B/196) – appears on page 96 of the album

Our Architectural Heritage

Proposed residence for JFT Hassell Esq.  State Library of Western Australia  ACC 7012A

Proposed residence for JFT Hassell Esq.
Bastow & Marwood, Architects
State Library of Western Australia ACC 7012A

A lighthouse design from the 1850s, an 1860s plan for a Perth residence (pictured), designs for European-style apartments or plans for contemporary homes, you will find these and more in the State Library collections. Included are examples of the work of some of Western Australia’s most prominent and influential architects.

Original archival plans, specifications, drawings and correspondence are supplemented by photographs, books and indexes referring to biographies and articles about individual architects.

Only a small number of items from these collections has been digitised. The State Library welcomes expressions of interest in sponsoring the digitising of more of these historic architectural records.

Bastow and Marwood
The partnership of Bastow and Marwood lasted only a year or so (1904).
Austin Bastow (1867-1942) was born in the United States. He moved to Tasmania with his parents and worked as an architect and land agent in Victoria, and Western Australia.
Harry Marmaduke Marwood (1873-1929) was born in Victoria and came to Western Australia during the goldrush era of the1890s.  He designed Grantown House and St George’s Buildings, Geraldton as well as numerous private residences.
Proposed residence for J F T Hassell:  Leases, licenses, and plans, 1862-1875

William G Bennett 1896-1977
William Garnsworthy Bennett was born in Victoria in 1896. He moved to Perth in 1910 and became the first locally trained architect to pass the Architect Board examination (July 1924). Many examples of Bennett’s work became prominent landmarks, including the Raffles Hotel, The Plaza Theatre and Arcade (Hay Street, Perth) and the Regal Theatre, Subiaco.
The collection includes certificates, architectural drawings, photographs, plans and specifications for residential and commercial buildings.
William G. Bennett & Associates records 1924-1976

Warwick Broomfield 1925-2005
Warwick Broomfield was born in Western Australia.  He  worked for W.G Bennett & Associates, Forbes and Fitzhardinge and later his own practice.
Broomfield was honorary architect to the National Trust of Australia and continued to work until his late seventies.  His work includes private homes, halls, apartments, commercial buildings and heritage projects.
Warwick Broomfield papers, 1954-1999 [manuscript]

Cameron Chisholm & Nicol (WA)
Originally established in Perth in 1884, this firm has been responsible for many major projects and buildings including the Empire Games Village (1962). The State Library holds several plans, specifications, photographs and some correspondence for the firm. (Access is restricted.)
Cameron, Chisholm and Nicol (W.A.) Pty. Ltd., 1962-1989 [manuscript]

Kitchen interior brick and tile house 1932 State Library of WA 101835PD

Kitchen interior brick and tile house 1932
State Library of Western Australia 101835PD

Marshall Waller Gervase Clifton (1903-1975)
Artist and architect Marshall Clifton was born in Western Australia to a pioneer family. Closely associated with the Royal Western Australian Historical Society and the W.A. Branch of the National Trust in the preservation and restoration of historic buildings in Western Australia.
Marshall Waller Gervase Clifton 1936-1978 [manuscript]

Stott residence Dalkeith 1962 Eric Moyle Architect State Library of WA 340565PD

Stott residence Dalkeith 1962
Eric Moyle Architect
State Library of Western Australia 340565PD

Julius Elischer 1918-2004
Julius Elischer was born and educated in Budapest. He designed many local civic buildings, churches, schools and retirement villages in Western Australia and had a special interest in low-cost building materials. Elischer’s buildings reflect his strong belief that responsible architecture should attempt to fit into its built surroundings.[1]
Elischer, Julius W. 1918-2004 [manuscript]

Margaret Anne Feilman 1921-2013
Dr Margaret Anne Feilman, OBE, BA (1943), Registered Architect (1946), was the first female architect cadet in the Public Works Department, Western Australia. She later established the firm Feilman Planning Consultants which was innovative in town planning and introduced the first environmental controls in local government town planning schemes in many areas.
Dr Feilman was instrumental in the establishment of the National Trust of Australia (WA) and was heavily involved in voluntary community work.
The collection consists of files listed alphabetically by local government authority and includes correspondence, plans, minutes, reports and photographs.
Margaret Feilman papers

Warden's Court Coolgardie  2012  State Library of WA b3604310 5

Warden’s Court Coolgardie 2012
State Library of Western Australia b3604310 5

Forbes and Fitzhardinge
The Library holds plans for churches, and commercial buildings by architects of the firm which eventually became Forbes and Fitzhardinge including Swan Boys’ Orphanage, various banks and churches, St George’s College (Crawley), and the Perth Tramway Company. Records start from 1880.
Collection of Architectural Plans of Public Buildings and Private Residences in Perth, Fremantle and Various Country Towns [technical drawing]
Forbes & Fitzhardinge, architects & planners [one volume of designs and plans]

Church of St Mary's priesthouse, Mullewa State Library of WA  005436D

Church of St Mary’s priesthouse, Mullewa
John Cyril Hawes Architect
State Library of Western Australia 005436D

John Cyril Hawes 1876-1956 State Library of WA   001989d

John Cyril Hawes 1876-1956
State Library of Western Australia 001989d

John Cyril Hawes (1876-1956)
John Cyril Hawes was an English architect. Originally an Anglican, he converted to Catholicism and eventually became a priest. He arrived in Western Australia in 1915 and stayed until 1939.  During his sojourn in Western Australia he designed and built 21 churches and convents.
Hawes, John Cyril, 1876-1956 Papers, 1919-1956 [manuscript]

Drawing of the proposed Magneto House 12 Milligan St Perth for M.J. Bateman Ltd 1927 State Library of WA  100233PD

Drawing of the proposed Magneto House 12 Milligan St Perth for M.J. Bateman Ltd 1927
State Library of Western Australia 100233PD

Hobbs, Smith & Forbes
The architectural firm Hobbs, Smith & Forbes was established in 1905 by Joseph John Talbot Hobbs (1864-1938). Hobbs was born in London and arrived in Western Australia in 1887.
This firm was responsible for buildings such as the Windsor Hotel, Swan Brewery Complex, the Weld Club (plans are not held for these) as well as the State War Memorial.
The collection includes architectural plans of various firms, Hobbs, Smith & Forbes, Eales Cohen & Bennett, P.W. Harrison, E.H. Dean-Smith. Plans include residences, hotels, schools and shearing sheds.
State War Memorial and Court of Contemplation, Kings Park, Perth, 1926-1998. [manuscript]
Hobbs, Smith & Forbes Plans

Iwanoff, Iwan, 1919-1986
Iwan Iwanoff was born in Bulgaria, studied in Germany and arrived in Western Australia in 1950. He was known for his distinctive modernist architecture.  His homes are now highly prized, with his “Marsala House” [1976] being the newest house on the Western Australian Heritage Register.
The Library holds plans, and specifications for many of Iwanoff’s buildings as well as photographs, an exhibition brochure, and articles.
Plans & specifications, 1951-1986 [manuscript]

Kos, Fritz c1927-2006 (architectural photographer)
Fritz Kos was one of Australia’s pre-eminent industrial and commercial photographers. His photography was often featured in Architecture Australia and other design publications. The images included in this collection document the architectural history of Western Australia from the 1960s through to the early 1990s.
Fritz Kos collection of photographs

Mount Eliza Flats  Krantz and Sheldon Architects State Library of WA b2812641 38

Mount Eliza Flats
Krantz and Sheldon Architects
State Library of Western Australia b2812641 38

Krantz and Sheldon
The company was established in the early 1930s by Harold Krantz, a nephew of Perth architect, Harold Boas. Krantz was then joined by Robert Schläfrig (who later changed his name to Sheldon), a Jewish-Viennese immigrant. Krantz and Sheldon went on to employ many migrant architects and draftsmen, including Iwan Iwanoff (see above) who was to become a well-known architect in his own right. The firm pioneered European architectural styles in Perth and was especially identified with the building of apartment blocks.
The Krantz and Sheldon architectural firm also operated as Krantz & Sheldon, Arndt, Silbert and West (KSASW) and Team Architects Australia.
The records comprise plans, company correspondence, financial records, files relating to architectural jobs completed, and photographs. Landmark buildings in Perth include Windsor Towers (South Perth), Bey Apartments (East Perth), and Mt Eliza Apartments, a building sometimes affectionately referred to as the ‘thermos flask’ built in Kings Park in 1964. There are plans of Government projects: schools, hospitals and State Housing works like Wandana (built in Subiaco in 1953) as well as many private dwellings and apartment blocks.
Complementing this collection the State Library holds two oral history interviews with Harold Abraham Krantz (1906-1999), as well as one with Fred McCardell, another prominent architect who worked at one time with the firm.
Only a fraction of this collection has been digitised.  To explore these items you need to do a keyword search in our catalogue using the terms KRANTZ and PLANS limiting to State Library Heritage Collections.

Peter Parkinson 1925-2014  Architect State Library of WA  b2480266

Peter Parkinson 1925-2014
Architect
State Library of Western Australia b2480266

Peter Parkinson 1925-2014
Peter Parkinson was a prominent Western Australian architect, theatre consultant and lecturer. His works include The Octagon Theatre and the New Dolphin Theatre at the University of Western Australia, major restorations to His Majesty’s Theatre, Perth (1977-1982), Subiaco Civic Hall, Churchlands Teachers College, Hayman Theatre (Curtin University), The Hole in the Wall Theatre, and many other commercial and residential properties.
Peter Parkinson papers 1950-2005 [manuscript]

Architectural_drawing_Riverside_Lodge  Krantz and Sheldon Architects State Library of WA 340436PD

Architectural_drawing_Riverside_Lodge
Krantz and Sheldon Architects
State Library of Western Australia 340436PD

 

George Herbert Parry 1882-1951
George Parry was born in Perth. He studied in England before returning to W.A. where he worked for the Public Works Department.  He later worked in partnership with J.C. and M.F. Cavanagh before starting his own consultancy. Parry had a particular interest in church architecture and designed several churches including St. Mary’s Anglican church, South Perth.

 

Parry and Rosenthal
Mervyn Henry Parry and Kenneth George Rosenthal formed the architectural partnership, Parry and Rosenthal Pty Ltd, in Perth Western Australia in 1959. This firm is still in practice.
Mervyn Henry Parry 1913-2006 was born in Subiaco, Western Australia, the son of architect George Herbert Parry. He studied in W.A. and England. He was a decorated airman in WWII. Mervyn Parry served as State President of the Royal Australian Institute of Architects (RAIA) in 1961-62, and National President 1966-67.
Kenneth George Rosenthal 1923-2008 was born in Western Australia. Rosenthal was also a pilot during WWII.
This collection consists of architectural drawings of public and church buildings, mostly by Herbert George Parry (see above). A number of the plans relate to St. George’s Cathedral, Perth, including some by Edmund Thomas Blacket.
Collection of architectural drawings, 1865-1954 [manuscript]

Somerville Auditorium (1957-1959) State Library of WA  b2825837 16

Somerville Auditorium (1957-1959)
Krantz and Sheldon Architects
State Library of Western Australia b2825837 16

Henry James Prockter (1863-1941)
Born and educated in England, Prockter practised in Melbourne before moving to Western Australia in 1896. He returned to England some time in 1913 or 1914 and died in Surrey in 1941.
Architectural drawings for several buildings in Northam: Papers, 1897-1906 [manuscript]
Windor Hall, Queens Crescent, Mt Lawley, September 1982 [photograph]

Windor Hall, Mt Lawley photograph 1982 H. J. Prockter Architect State Library of WA  311467PD

Windor Hall, Mt Lawley 1982
H. J. Prockter Architect
State Library of Western Australia 311467PD

Charles Sierakowski (1924-2009)
Born in Poland, Sierakowski was involved with the Polish underground during the Second World War. He studied Architecture in London and came to Western Australia in 1973.  Sierakowski was involved in the design of the Art Gallery of Western Australia. These papers relate to this work.
Papers of Charles Sierakowski: Architect [Manuscript]

Anthony (Toni) Solarski
Toni Solarski was born in Obarzance, near Tarnopol, Poland in 1920. He grew up and went to school in Tarnopol.  After serving with the Polish Second Corp within the British Army during WW2 he studied architecture in Rome and London. Solarski emigrated to Western Australia c1954.
The State Library holds plans for a variety of new buildings and renovations by Solarski.
Solarski, Anthony:  Papers [manuscript]

Richard Spanney 1884 – 1948
Born in Hansborough, South Australia, Richard Spanney (born Rudolph Richard Spangenberg) came to Western Australia in 1906. He designed St John’s Lutheran Church and the Greek Orthodox Church, both in Northbridge, as well as homes for many prominent Perth families. He was also employed by the Department of Works and Housing.
Richard Spanney papers, 1923-1951 [manuscript]

Metro Cinema Perth upstairs foyer c1940 State Library of WA  004214D

Metro Cinema Perth upstairs foyer c1940
State Library of Western Australia 004214D

Summerhayes & Associates
The State Library holds several plans and a small collection of photographs relating to this firm. To find the photographs search the catalogue under subject: Summerhayes and select State Library Pictures from the drop down box.
Summerhayes & Associates records

The State Library also holds various individual items including plans, correspondence, photographs and biographical information relating to a number of other architects who have worked in Western Australia. These include Alfred Edward Cox, Claude Nicholas, Charles Lancelot Oldham, John Pidgeon and Paul Ritter.

Biographies
Morison, Margaret Pitt
Immigrant architects in Western Australia, 1885-1905
Ephemera item:  PR13589
Australian Institute of Architects, Western Australian architect biographies:
http://architecture.com.au/architecture/state-territory/wa-architecture
Australian Dictionary of Biography
http://adb.anu.edu.au/

Oral Histories
There are two main series of interviews:
Architects and Architecture: a series of interviews with 50 Western Australian Architects.
and
Architecture plans for life radio program (21 interviews)
These may be found by doing a keyword search in the catalogue using the terms: ARCHITECTS and INTERVIEWS

Photographs
Interiors
Search the catalogue under keyword using the term INTERIORS and limiting to State Library Pictures from the drop-down menu.
Buildings
Search the catalogue using such terms as DWELLINGS or HOUSES or FLATS or APARTMENTS or HISTORIC BUILDINGS and limiting to State Library Pictures from the drop-down menu.
Hint: Particular homes may be found under the name of the original owner or the address of the home.

General works on architecture
If you are interested in the subject of architecture you may also wish to explore our extensive general reference collections.  Visit the State Library Catalogue and select subject from the drop-down menu. Enter the term ARCHITECTURE.  There are over 5,000 items including books and journal articles from our eresources.  Alternatively you can search under the keyword ARCHITECTURE and add another term such as DOMESTIC or AUSTRALIA or COLONIAL or such terms as ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING.

State Records Office
The State Records Office of Western Australia also holds a large collection of architectural plans and drawings produced or amassed by various government agencies. While much of these will be relating to government buildings there are many reasons for government agencies to hold copies of plans for commercial and private properties. Further information may be found at:
http://www.sro.wa.gov.au/archive-collection/collection/architectural-records

[1] Source: Post News, Perth 21 February 2004

Memory House goes State-wide

In 2014 our Memory House exhibition celebrated  the sights, smells, tastes, sounds and textures of Western Australia.

To encourage representation of the entire state, we invited selected regional public libraries to host a Memory House letterbox giving their communities an opportunity to share memories of their area on postcards.

The Libraries set up displays around the letterboxes and held events to facilitate memory sharing and discussion. Libraries decorated their letterboxes in a style that reflected their region.

Broome Library gets into the Memory House spirit, 2014. Photo credit: Broome Library

Broome Library gets into the Memory House spirit with their display, 2014. Photo: Broome Library

There were some outstanding responses from the regions. We thank the following participating libraries and community members for their contributions: South Hedland, Exmouth, Narrogin, Merredin, Broome, Karratha, Dampier, Wickham, Roebourne, Geraldton, Laverton, Toodyay, Busselton and Albany.

View the full collection of letterboxes and postcards at the State Library on the 1 June for WA Day. Here are some of our regional highlights:

Pearl Ashwin (Baumgarten) attended a seniors morning tea at South Hedland Library as part of Memory House. There she was delighted to find an image of herself as a young nurse. Pearl’s photo was featured on a postcard promoting Storylines, an online archive relating to Aboriginal history in Western Australia.

Pearl Ashwin with  photograph, South Hedland Library 2014. Photo credit: South Hedland Library

Pearl Ashwin with photograph, South Hedland Library 2014. Photo credit: South Hedland Library

Pearl Ashwin was one of the first Aboriginal women in Meekatharra to become a registered nurse. In the postcard she is pictured working at Meekatharra hospital. South Hedland Library staff were able to capture this photo of Pearl with her postcard.

Toodyay Library hosted ‘Internment to Enlightenment’, a historical walk and guest speaker presentation by Beth Frayne from the Toodyay Historical Society. The talk began at the Old Gaol Museum and ended at the Toodyay Library, where participants shared Toodyay memories. Among postcard contributions were unique Toodyay smells including, “Coal being shovelled into the boiler of the Toodyay steam train” and sounds such as “Kookaburra’s laughing” and “Bees humming in a jacaranda tree”.

Part

Toodyay Library ‘Internment to Enlightenment’ 2014. Photo credit: Toodyay Library

Merredin’s Local Fine Art Society produced this beautifully painted letter box displaying the vivid colours of the wheatbelt region.

Merredin Library letterbox (details), Merredin Artist Society 2014

Merredin Library letterbox (details), Merredin Artist Society 2014

Merredin Library letterbox (details), Merredin Artist Society 2014

Merredin Library letterbox (details), Merredin Artist Society 2014

Narrogin Library hosted an exhibition, ‘seniors through the eyes of youth’ at  Narrogin ARtSpace.  Seniors were paired with young people, and they were encouraged to share their stories. The activity culminated with a photographic exhibition during Seniors Week.

The Memory House regional engagement project was made possible through the generous support of the State Library of Western Australia Foundation and Lotterywest.

Five minutes with Shaun Tan

Our recent exhibition showcased original artwork from Shaun Tan’s award winning picture book Rules of Summer.  The Perth born artist, writer, and illustrator reveals what he thought about your summer rules, and insights into the mysterious world depicted in the book.

“Never wash your cat” 

I like this one, because we kind of know it’s unnecessary or difficult to wash a cat, but it’s never spelt out, or the consequences discussed. It would be wonderful to see an image accompanying this, where a good and earnest gesture has gone terribly wrong: you were only trying to help the cat! Suddenly it owns you as a pet, has shrunk into a tiny demon, or grown fins and must be set free at the beach, turned to stone, melted, the possibilities are endless. How often has something more or less like this happened in real life? It reminds me of my wife’s story of collecting snow as a child, to make a snowman, from the bonnet of a neighbour’s car: innocent enough, until you realise she was using a snow shovel! Often it’s impossible to know you are making a mistake until you’ve already made it, and not just as a child. It all carries on into adulthood, common sense doesn’t always win.

Never Eat A Turtle

“Never eat a Turtle” 

This is a good one too, because it might draw attention to the arbitrary nature of the human diet. ie. It’s okay to eat tuna or octopus (both quite intelligent and beautiful animals), but we might bulk at dolphins or turtles. Historically, a lot of cultural taboos have revolved around certain foods, without the consequences explained fully. Perhaps in this case, you will become a turtle yourself, or have to carry your own bedroom on your back forever, or simply be known as a turtle-eater and banished from society – and you might never know why. Of course, the real reason is probably that turtles are so vulnerable to exploitation, with many already extinct or heading that way. So any rule that stops people from eating turtles is probably a good one, no matter how absurd it is.

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Left: Never drop your jar, Oil on canvas, 2013 Right, Cat person, Never give your keys to a stranger, Oil on canvas, 2013

You grew up in the northern suburbs of Perth. The illustrations ‘Never drop your jar’ and ‘Never step on a snail’ convey a sense of summer heat which could be likened to the scorching Western Australian sun. What do you remember most about growing up in Perth?

Well certainly the heat and light. The jar-dropping scene comes from memories of rock fishing, which was the main past-time of my family during summer holidays, usually either along the northern coast or down in Margaret River, and it was usually pretty hot with little shelter in sight either way. So not unlike fishing from rooftops (the water tanks in my picture come from New York, which can also be stifling in summer). I was not as good an angler as my brother, and prone to dropping things – fish, tackle, bait – among the rocks. He would then come and help me out, being nowhere near as mean or indifferent as the boy in the book. In any case, the overriding memory of my childhood in Perth is space, light and time. Everything seemed so much bigger and elemental, for better or worse. Summer holidays seemed epic back then, whereas everything these days seems more like diminishing little squares on a calendar!

The unnerving crow/ raven features in each of the paintings, often subtle, but always present. Can you explain a bit about why you chose the crow?

I used to paint crows (or Australian ravens, as they are actually are) quite a lot in my early twenties: large landscapes with quiet houses and trees, no people in sight, but lots of crows. In one respect, this is just what I saw when I went for long walks in the northern suburbs. I don’t see them as an evil or sinister presence, but more like something ancient and enduring, as if they are just watching us come and go in daily life as well as in history, and watching our mistakes too. In the Rules of Summer, they don’t actually do anything bad, but I feel that they might, if given a reason. By themselves, they are just crows. Perhaps they find humans to be the dark and sinister ones.

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Left: Rescue, Always bring bolt cutters, Oil on canvas, 2013 Right: Never loose a fight, Oil on canvas, 2013

There is something about the rescue scene ‘Always bring bolt cutters’ which reminded one of our visitors of the famous bicycle scene in the film ET.  In the process of illustrating do you think about your artistic and cultural influences deliberately or do they appear automatically?

The E.T. similarity never occured to me, but I guess it’s there, and definitely many films have fed my subconscious over the years – The Lost Thing actually has an E.T. resonance also. When I’m drawing or writing, I don’t think so much about influences or references though, I just work with whatever comes to mind, so if they do appear, it’s automatic rather than deliberate. Often I only consider possible origins later, usually when I’m editing a story or painting, which I think is the longest and most thoughtful part of the creative process, more so than the initial flurry of ideas.

A lot of your work deals with surreal imagery. Where does this inspiration come from?

It’s quite hard to say. I also like to paint ‘normal’ things, but then get to a point where it feels too much like an imitation of reality, and it needs to comment on something else, to come from a more unusual perspective. It’s trying to see familiar things as if for the first time. Imagine you’d never seen a fish before, or a tree, or a cloud. That kind of revelatory experience is what I’m looking for in pictures and stories. Painting is a bit like having a second childhood as an adult, seeing everything as new all over again.

In Rules of Summer  the text illustrates the pictures and the pictures the text. Which comes first for you Illustrations or words?

They both come in drips and drabs, and I change them a lot as the book evolves over a long period. I often think of it as a ping-pong relationship, a bit of writing might trigger an image, which triggers another written expression, which that suggests something else to draw. At some point I stop when things feel sufficiently meaningful (or not!) but before they become too explanatory. I also end up removing a lot of stuff from the final version, trying to keep it all a bit mysterious, not giving too much away.

  • View more of your summer words of wisdom on our Flickr
  • Teachers can book Rules of Summer school programs by contacting The Literature Centre Inc Fremantle.
  • Copies of Rules of Summer can be purchased from the State Library book shop.
  • Find out more about Shaun Tan.
  • Watch an interview with Shaun Tan on our YouTube