A Crash of Rhinos in Wanneroo

With a flamboyance of flamingos, a murder of crows,  a band of gorillas and a parliament of owls, Patricia Mullins A Crash of Rhinos is a picture book which delights the ears and the eyes. Marvel at the original illustrations and sketches currently on display at the Wanneroo Gallery Library and Cultural Centre.

The energetic illustrations and and clever use of collective nouns in A Crash of Rhinos entertains and amuses readers of all ages.  Patricia Mullins unique illustrative style involves collage and layering of coloured tissue paper, with pen and ink drawings, to build up the action in each of her scenes.

pwc_161_mullins

A band of gorillas, 2010, Patricia Mullins, State Library of Western Australia, PWC161 

The exhibition at Wanneroo Gallery marks the first time the complete collection from the book is displayed outside of the State Library of Western Australia.  Acquired in 2011 for the State Library’s collection, it includes original illustrations, preliminary sketches, story boards, and working notes, which provide a unique insight into Patricia Mullins creative process.

One of Patricia Mullins motivations for writing and illustrating is to share her love of language through her stories.

“I’d love them (children) to learn about language through just discovering words, through making up their own words, through understanding that it’s easy and that it can be fun. It’s not about sitting down and learning ‘this is a collective noun’ – it’s about how to use that language…thinking about what language is.” – Patricia Mullins

pwc_169_mullins

A platter of platypuses, 2010, Patricia Mullins, State Library of Western Australia collection, PWC/169 

Patricia Mullins has authored and illustrated a number of picture books including Hattie and Fox (1986), Crocodile Beat (1988), Dinosaur Encore (1992) and Lightening Jack (2012).  A Crash of Rhinos  published by ABC Books by was awarded the Notable Book (Picture Book of the Year) in the Children’s Book Council of Australia Awards, 2011.

Visitors to the exhibition  are invited to take part in a series of free activities and art workshops.

A Crash of Rhinos is on is on display at Wanneroo Gallery Library and Cultural Centre until 12 October 2016. For opening hours and further information visit: wanneroo.wa.gov.au

Legal Deposit is for you

Legal Deposits Cover Image

Are you a writer, editor, musician or film-maker?

Have you produced your own book, magazine, pamphlet, CD or DVD for the public?

Have you given a copy to the State Library?

If you prepare and issue your own work to the public without the involvement of an established publisher, this is called self-publishing. When you give a copy of your self-published work to the State Library, the public can access it and learn of our history.  The State Library carefully maintains your publication in its original state for many years to come.

You will also meet your legal responsibilities (Legal Deposit Act and Regulations) that apply to self-publishers and commercial publishers. Your publication is protected from unauthorised copying by law (Copyright Act and Regulations), including your music and film.

Western Australians have helped preserve our history by giving to the State Library:

Post your publication to Legal Deposit, State Library of Western Australia, 25 Francis Street, Perth 6000. Or bring it with you to the State Library.  You may also wish to donate a second copy, to help us preserve the first copy.

For more information visit www.slwa.wa.gov.au, email legal.deposit@slwa.wa.gov.au or phone 9427 3348.

Equipment used in the Conservation Lab

There are many valued and interesting pieces of equipment necessary for us to properly treat objects in the lab. Let me introduce you to some of them!

Board cutting machine

Valiani

As the name suggests we use a board cutting machine to cut board. This machine is used daily to cut and crease boxes which are then folded and glued by hand.

We also use the board cutting machine to cut out mats when framing objects, inserts to fit out boxes and backing boards. In fact anything that fits the dimensions of the table and is made of board may be cut using this machine.

In the past boxes, folders and cutting mats were done by hand. It took approximately 40 hours to make 30 boxes. We are now able to cut up to 65 tailor made boxes per day, i.e. each book is measured and a perfect match is produced.  Conservation is currently running a boxing program to house all our Rare Heritage materials. We box as a preventative measure to protect materials. By boxing we are creating a micro environment; temperature and humidity become more stable, direct light is deflected, materials are not damaged when handled or when placed on a shelf.

Boxes                                   Folders                                  Mats

A microscope is a handy piece of equipment to have around when your job is to see what is wrong with an object and to try to stop it from deteriorating further. Using a microscope to examine an object can allow us to see problems that cannot be seen by the naked eye and closely investigate problems in greater detail. Currently this microscope is been used on our photographic panoramas.

Microscope

full shot microscope

A microscope is a handy piece of equipment to have around when your job is to see what is wrong with an object and to try to stop it from deteriorating further. Using a microscope to examine an object can allow us to see problems that cannot be seen by the naked eye and closely investigate problems in greater detail. Currently this microscope is been used on our photographic panoramas.

Item been worked on                         Through the Microscope

Using a microscope in this example has allowed for tears to be correctly aligned; to consolidate flaking gelatine; to accurately repair small losses and assist with the application of a surface gelatine cote over both scratches and tears where necessary.

Suction/Humidification Table

Suction Table                                            Humidification Chamber

The suction table is used for any porous 2-dimensional collection items, usually paper or textile. The perforated surface of the table is equipped with an adjustable suction level to suit  various treatments, for example; localised washing of dirt and/or stains, controlled drying, lining and treatments where it is necessary to monitor humidity or use a liquid solution safely.

The humidification chamber sits on top of the suction table and can be used for mass humidification, humidifying large objects or applying steam as the best option. We often humidify an item preparing  it for flattening.

Did you find this article interesting? Would you like to hear more about the conservation lab or our equipment? Please comment below with any questions, suggestions or feedback below.

 

Dutch Community Open Day

Clipping1

An afternoon of talks, story sharing, digitisation opportunities, and curatorial tours relating to our current exhibition Dutch Journeys to the Western Edge.

Sunday 7 August 1:00 – 4:30pm
State Library of Western Australia
Free event –bookings required


Talks 1:00 – 2:30pm
Dutch Doings: 400 years of Dutch connections with With WA
State Library Theatre (Ground Floor)
Presenter: Dr Nonja Peters

Visual & Material Interfaces: Dutch artists in WA
State Library Theatre (Ground Floor)
Presenter: Nien Schwarz

In Western Australia how have Dutch explorers, migrant artists and artists of Dutch descent communicated their experiences of this place? Based on my curatorial research and associated publications this talk includes a panorama of visual, material and emotional encounters from ship to shore.

400 Years of Dutch Business in WA
State Library Theatre (Ground Floor)
Presenter: Arnold Stroobach

Dutch Down Under: RNN submariners in WA during WWII
State Library Theatre (Ground Floor)
Presenter: Sally May

Other activities

Being Dutch in WA
1:00pm – 2:30pm
3:30pm – 4:00pm
Exhibition Gallery (Ground Floor)

Share and record your perspectives on being Dutch in Western Australia. Your words will be added to the State Library’s heritage collection to enrich the items donated to the Library by Nonja Peters. The recordings will also be featured in the future online version of the exhibition.

Scanning Station
1:00pm – 4:30pm
Kimberley Room (Ground Floor)

Bring along some of your old family photographs and start building your own digital archive. State Library staff will assist you to scan your photographs, providing you with digital copies for the long term preservation of your images.

Family History stall
3:00pm – 4:30pm
State Library Theatre Foyer (Ground Floor)

Marjorie Bly from the National Archives of Australia will be on hand to help you research your Dutch heritage. She will be able to offer hints and tips on tracing your Dutch family history.

Curator’s Tour
3:00pm – 3:30pm
4:00pm – 4:30pm
Exhibition Gallery (Ground Floor)

Join Nonja Peters as she takes you on a tour of the exhibition: Dutch Journeys to the Western Edge.
DutchJourneysLO

 

 

 

 

 

From Dirk Hartog’s landing at remote Cape Inscription in 1616 to our present migrant connections, Dutch Journeys to the Western Edge draws stories from the collections in the State Library. Whether seeking trade, refuge or opportunity the Dutch, like others to land on our shores, have helped shape Western Australia Dutch Journeys to the Western Edge is on display in the State Library until 25 September 2016. For more information visit our website 

 

Prisoner of war toilet roll diary now online

One of the more unusual items in the State Library’s collection is this diary written by Raymond Stewart on a toilet roll while he was a prisoner of war during World War II. Raymond kindly donated this unique diary to the Library in 1999. It is written in pencil on poor quality paper and is housed in our rare materials security stack at a controlled temperature of 20 degrees +/- 2 degrees with a humidity level of 50% +/- 5%. These stable conditions  help to preserve this fragile item.

Toilet Roll Diary02

Raymond Stewart’s toilet roll diary housed in its special conservation box, ACC 5062A/5

Lieutenant Raymond Stanley Stewart (2/28th Australian Infantry Battalion) enlisted in Northam in 1940 and was captured on 27 July 1942 at Ruin Ridge, El Alamein, Egypt. He was held as a prisoner of war in Europe, firstly by the Italians and later by the Germans, until 1 May 1945. He recorded his experiences in this most unusual diary between 27 July and 12 September 1942, later continuing in two notebooks.

slwa_b4105398_362

Raymond’s prisoner of war card with photograph, ACC 5062A/11

Keeping such a record was a tremendous risk so Raymond kept the diaries hidden in an Australian Red Cross Society gift box.

IMG_5896

The Australian Red Cross Society gift box where Raymond kept his diaries hidden, ACC 5062A/15

The toilet roll diary provides a fascinating insight into the daily life of a prisoner of war. Raymond describes his feelings on being captured:
“I feel miserable, angry, disillusioned and relieved in turn. I think everyone feels the same way. The boys crack jokes to hide their feelings.”

There is confusion about the fate of his comrades:
“Did Jack come through? Where is Smithie? Is it true that Snooks was killed?”

On 5th August 1942, just over a week after his capture, he describes his hunger:
“Already we are all feeling continuously and desperately hungry. Our ration is eaten as follows:- 1/2 tin bully and 1/3 bread for lunch, ditto tea, and coffee and remainder of bread for breakfast. I myself am feeling very weak and have a temporary blackout once during the day on getting up from my bed. This may have been due to bad ventilation as much as anything else. It is an effort to walk around very much as I simply haven’t the energy.

Just through the fence they are dumping hundreds of cases of lemons. We are so hungry we beg for them from the guards, and eat them raw peel and all. However they don’t give much away and even then I think it is only for the amusement they get from seeing us scramble for them.”

This diary formed part of the National Treasures from Australia’s Great Libraries exhibition which toured capital cities around the country from 2005 to 2007. Now the Raymond Stanley Stewart diaries have been made available for anyone to read online. In some places they are difficult to decipher but a transcript has also been placed online.

As you can imagine, digitising a toilet roll presented some challenges. The diary is extremely delicate and fragile; of course the paper is biodegradable and was never intended to last. Our reformatting staff  say that this is the most challenging item they have ever digitised; the toilet roll diary alone took over twenty hours to complete. It was photographed using a Hasselblad camera which has extremely accurate colour fidelity and the ability to retain exceptional quality of detail. The images shown here illustrate some of the processes involved in bringing this item to you.

IMG_5900

The toilet roll diary held in place with glass weights

Toilet Roll Being Shot017

Our Senior Conservator unwinding the toilet roll during filming

IMG_5884

Carefully rewinding the diary after filming

IMG_5914

Returning the diary to its box

Toilet Roll Being Shot035

Checking the quality of the digitised image

It is wonderful that Raymond Stewart realised the historical significance of his diary and had the forethought to donate it to the State Library so it could be preserved for the future. What other treasures could be hidden in wardrobes or attics in private homes around the state?

If you are interested in finding out more about donating to the Library please visit our Donations page.

Digital Preservation vs Storage: Why is digital preservation different to digital storage?

Digital preservation is about maintaining access to digital files over (long periods of) time, whereas digital storage is about keeping the digital items themselves.

Though digital preservation includes storage of digital items (keeping the 1s and 0s that make up digital files) safe and sound, there is more than to it than that.

In the same way that we look after our hardcopy heritage items, we need to keep the 1s and 0s of digital heritage items in the best conditions.  Following (IT) industry standard, we back up our files in multiple physical locations, on different media, and make regular backups of our content.  Doing this minimises the risk of any issues occurring (e.g. a physical disaster like a fire), and ensuring copies of our data are on different media helps protect against issues related to specific hardware (e.g. a bad batch of discs, or a certain type of backup tape becoming obsolete).

512px-Floppy_Disk_Drives_8_5_3

Floppy disc drives – examples of obsolete hardware

For digital preservation purposes, when we receive a digital file, we take note of how it came to us.  We look at what type of content it is (a text file, an image, a sound recording), as well as what file type it is (.doc, .jpeg, .mp3), and what type of software is needed to open or view the file.  These pieces of information help us to know what to do with the file, and also what type of risks this file may be exposed to.

File types can be considered at risk because of a number of reasons – the company that created the file type may abandon support of the program needed to open the file, or upgrades to software may result in older files becoming inaccessible.  In DigitalLand, it’s very likely that certain files are only supported on certain computer operating systems, and sometimes those operating systems are hard to come by (Windows version 3.1 anyone?).

When we receive files, we keep an exact copy of what we have received, as well as making a copy of the file in an open format (i.e. a format that can be used by anyone).  We also create versions of the file (derivatives) for delivery over the web.  Luckily for us, most of this processing happens automatically, so it’s not a matter of a person opening a file and saving lots of different versions of that file, which frees us up to collect even more files!

Even once we have made the different copies, and are confident that our backups are secure, our job is not yet over; as we need to stay tuned for changes that may mean that we need to migrate our files into new(er) formats, so we can continue to offer access to the files using current technology.  We are regularly are seeing new file types emerge (e.g. 360 degree video), and are seeing many more digital files coming to us, as more and more people turn to digital methods to capture and re-tell their stories.

In terms of storage, to protect your own digital files, here are some steps you can take;

  • Make sure you know where your files are (many of us have files in different places – e.g. some files on a laptop, some on a mobile phone and others on an external hard disc)
  • Consolidate and make more than one copy of the files – copy all your files to one location, then make backups from that place to other media. Many people now have access to online (web) storage, as well as traditional media such as discs.
  • Ensure you have the environment (software/hardware) that you need to open the file, and that you have all the peripherals you need (do you know where that cable or power supply you need to connect that hard drive is?). Where you need special software to open the file, and that software is ageing, can you save it to a modern format?
  • Migrate the content to new media regularly – every couple of years, replace the media you are using to back up your digital files. Though media is generally stable for a few years, the risk to losing data off this media increases with every year that passes

SAN

The storage array at the State Library

 

The Metropolitan Dental Company

Teeth of Charm and beauty slwa_b2034953_18

One would not normally associate a dental company with glitz and glamour, but during the first half of the 20th century Perth’s major dental firm had an image of modernity and high fashion without equal in Western Australia.

The Metropolitan Dental Company was established in 1908 advertising its aim to provide affordable dental care for all, including people on lower incomes.

2016-06-21_1503

Advertising for dental products from the ephemera collection of the Metropolitan Dental Company.

0005 (5)

Advertising for dental products from the ephemera collection of the Metropolitan Dental Company.

The State Library has a small but delightful collection of material relating to the Metropolitan Dental Company including photographs, a day book, scrapbooks, certificates, advertising mock-ups and other ephemera.

Metropolitan_Dental_Company_proposed_offices__2016-06-21_1651

Drawing of the (proposed?) exterior of the Metropolitan Dental Company 00716D

Hay Street, Perth premises of the Metropolitan Dental Company slwa_b3473316_2

Hay Street, Perth premises of the Metropolitan Dental Company 1927 100182PD

Metropolitan Dental Company

The building at 790 Hay Street, Perth today. [The Apple Store] Photo: Google Maps Street View.

The Company was described as the biggest in the Southern Hemisphere. The owners were Wolf Blitz, Alfred Kaufman, and Alfred Rogers, with notable dentists such as Edgar McGillicuddy, Thomas Wilson and Albert E. Ford working for the company at various times.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Metropolitan Dental Company advertised widely in newspapers, using the lure of a short anecdote or educational snippet followed by an invitation to use their services. In fact they made an art of the “advertorial”.  Some examples of marketing gems from Trove Newspapers include:

“Aseptic  Methods in  Modern Dentistry” – absolutely sterile instruments…

“Deadlier than Snake Venom” – food detritus and tooth cavities.

“Mental, Physical and Moral Degeneration” – the link between juvenile delinquency and bad teeth…“Private health really means public morals”.  [Yes! Really.]

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

A day book from 1908 lists appointments, treatment and fees charged. It is noted that Mrs Townsend of Highgate Hill had to cut short her treatment on being called away to Albany “her child having broken its collarbone”.

Included in the collection are some original artworks for advertising and for the windows of the company’s offices. A mock-up for a Neon sign is so impressively bright that one is tempted to take it into a darkened room to see if it glows.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Also in the advertising ephemera are several metal printer’s engraving plates that are wonderful works of art in their own right.

0050 (5)

Metropolitan Dental Company collection ACC1863A/19

To associate an air of beauty and sophistication with a dental firm is no easy task, but the Metropolitan Dental Company achieved this by employing attractive young women to grace their colourful posters.

The full collection of photographs may be viewed here.

The Metropolitan Dental Company is just one of the private business archives in the State Library Collections. These records provide a view into a past that is so much more vibrant and interesting than we may have thought from viewing black and white photographs.

We are always pleased to hear from members of the community who may have private business records that they would like to be considered for the State Heritage Collections.

Sketchbooks tour the state

IMG_3062__The Nook Sketchbooks_Apr 2016

From DaVinci, to Beethoven, to Hemingway, to Kahlo, sketchbooks have provided a space for the greatest works and stories of our time to grow.

Over 100 sketchbooks displaying the talent of young Western Australians have recently embarked on a tour of 16 WA Public Libraries as part of the Travelling Sketchbook exhibition.

Each year young people aged 12-26 are invited to participate in filling a blank sketchbook with stories, artwork, illustration, collage and more as part of Propel Youth Arts WA’s Sketchbook project. Some are lighthearted and funny, others are deeply personal and all showcase creativity and talent of contributors.

Designed to be browsed and flicked through, the 9 x 14 cm sketchbooks together represent a visual exploration of the  personal lives, interests, and observations of young people growing up in Western Australia in 2016.

Follow the sketchbook journey around Western Australia as they visit a Public Library near you.

 This exhibition is presented by Propel Youth Arts WA with the support of the State Library and Department of Local Government and Communities. 

Sketchbook Tour Itinerary 
1-30 June 2016 
Bunbury Library, 1 Parkfield St Bunbury
Donnybrook Library, 10 Bentley Street Donnybrook

8-29 July 2016 
Katanning Library, Austral Terrace Katanning
Canarvon Library, 18 Egan St Carnarvon

10 – 31 August 2016 
Mandurah Library, 3 Peel St Mandurah
Northam Library, 298 Fitzgerald St Northam

12 September – 10 October 2016 
Broome Library, Hamersley St Broome
Karratha Library, Dampier Hwy Karratha

19 October – 14 November 2016 
Port Hedland Library, Colebatch Way South Hedland
Derby Public Library, Clarendon St Derby

25 November – 15 December 2016 
The Grove Library, 1 Leake St Peppermint Grove

19 December – 7 January 2016 
Fremantle Library, 8 William St Fremantle

25 November – 7 January 2016 
Manjimup Library, Rose St Manjimup

13-31 January 2017 
Esperance Public Library, Windich St Esperance
Kalgoorlie Public Library, 13 Roberts St South Kalgoorlie

1-24 February 2017 
Mount Barker Public Library, Lowood Road Mount Barker

IMG_3147__The Nook Sketchbooks_Apr 2016

Final week to see Unfinished Business

The statement ‘without stories there is silence’ powerfully captures the essence of this exhibition.

Unfinished Business brings to focus the voices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples who are affected by disability through photographs by Belinda Mason and film by Knierim Brothers.

Historically the voices of Aboriginal and Torres Islander peoples, and the voices of people with disability have been misrepresented, silenced or excluded from documentary histories.

The images and words of this exhibition convey the reality of lives affected by the ongoing historical, social and political impacts of colonialism. The stories represented in the exhibition are not sugar coated. They are raw and honest, attesting to the strength, resilience and power of all participants, and all people with experiences of disability.

IMG_3523__Unfinished Business 12-5-16.jpg

Yamatji man, Marlon Noble with his photograph titled ‘Noble Cause’, Unfinished Business exhibition launch, State Library of Western Australia 12 May 2016.

Photography is a creative expression which is capable of commanding the viewer’s attention. Each photograph has power to open the eyes of the audience, conveying personal stories in an autobiographical way. We have seen this in action, where visitors stop, take time to experience and are visibly moved by the images.

Accessibility is a the core of this exhibition. The Open Access Tours app provides access to additional audio and video material.

Unfinished Business closes 3 June 2016. For more information visit the State Library website.

IMG_3551__Unfinished Business 12-5-16.jpg
IMG_3041__Unfinished Business exhibition_8-4-16.jpg

 

Juniper App

Have you explored our Juniper App?

The Juniper App showcases a series of artworks created in the 1970’s by prolific Western Australian artist Robert Juniper, and the children’s book which they were created for, “Mason Judy”.

Mason Judy is the story of an eight year old boy who is lonely and unhappy when his family moves to a new suburb. He finds a magic stone which transports him to another time and place.  There he meets the Guardian of the Stone, who takes him on a journey to return it to its traditional dwelling place.  Along the way he undergoes many trials which test his strength of character.

20_Juniper_Japara was now a black spot

PWC/231/120: Japara was now a black speck in the purple distance, original illustration by Robert Juniper reproduced in the book, Mason Judy

Author Trevor Todd wrote the  Mason Judy story as part of a creative writing class in 1975; he gave his friends copies of his typed manuscript as Christmas gifts that year, and one of them passed his copy onto Robert Juniper, who offered to illustrate the book.

slwa_b2435548_7

215723PD: Robert Juniper painting, 1977

The State Library was fortunate to acquire Robert Juniper’s work, with the assistance of the State Library’s Foundation.  They are now part of a larger collection of original artworks from children’s literature held by the Library, the Peter Williams Collection.

The development of the App was part of a wider project to provide universal access to the State Library’s rare material through digitisation and brings both the artwork and the story to a whole new audience.

Through the App, users can explore both the story and paintings in depth, and through a supporting education program, explore the social and community environment at the time.   Users can also enjoy listening to a reading by the author, and understand the perspective of an Indigenous curator, whose comments and insight can be seen alongside the artwork.

The Juniper App can be downloaded for iPad or Android tablet using the links below:

download       Android-app-on-google-play.svg