Sailing great Jon Sanders visits State Library

Yachting legend Jon Sanders world record for sailing around the world three times solo is still unbroken.  His Perie Banou log book is on display now at State Library of Western Australia. 

In 1988 Sanders changed global yachting history when he broke the Guinness World Record for the longest distance ever sailed continuously by a vessel after travelling 658 days, 21 hours and 18 minutes at sea.

Evan Collins, Jon Sanders arrives at Fremantle on the Parry Endevour after his triple circumnavigation of the world, 13 March 1988, 135227PD – 125229PD, State Library of Western Australia pictorial collection.

Evan Collins, Jon Sanders arrives at Fremantle on the Parry Endevour after his triple circumnavigation of the world, 13 March 1988, 135227PD,  State Library of Western Australia pictorial collection.

Following his ninth circumnavigation of the world, the Perth born sailor has returned to Perth and recently visited Sailing on the Swan at the State Library.

The exhibition features original material including one of Sanders sailing log books from his double circumnavigation of the world aboard Perie Banou. The log records the ships position, current speeds, wind directions, and bearings. The page displayed shows notes from Perie Banou’s sail through the treacherous currents and hazardous winds in Southern Chile around Cape Horne.

Roger Garwood, Jon Sanders returns to Royal Perth Yacht Club on 31 October 1982 after his double circumnavigation of the world on Perie Banou, 1982, 296493PD, State Library of Western Australia pictorial collection

Roger Garwood, Jon Sanders returns to Royal Perth Yacht Club on 31 October 1982 after his double circumnavigation of the world on Perie Banou, 1982, 296493PD, State Library of Western Australia pictorial collection.

Exhibition highlights include a 1988 photograph of Sanders on Parry Endevour. The photograph was taken two days before he broke the world record for triple circumnavigation of the world.  Upon viewing the photo in the exhibition Sanders recalled that at the time strong winds forced a closure of Perth airport.

Jon Sanders pictured with photograph of Parry Endevour at Cape Leeuwin.

Jon Sanders pictured with photograph of Parry Endevour at Cape Leeuwin.

Interested in checking yacht log entries surrounding the Fauklands conflict in 1982,  Sanders reacquainted himself with the remainder of his 1979-1982 Perie Banou logbooks, held in the State Library heritage collections (ACC3229A). He recalled an entry where BBC Argentina “warned shipping to stay out of the 200 mile maritime zone around Fauklands”. The ten week war in 1982 between Argentina and the United Kingdom was over two British territories in the South Atlantic.

Jon Sanders with the Perie Banou logbooks

Jon Sanders with the Perie Banou logbooks

Sailing on the Swan is presented by the Royal Perth Yacht Club. The exhibition is on display at the State Library of Western Australia Ground Floor Gallery until May 3. Open during library hours.

Five minutes with Kyle Hughes-Odgers

Kyle Hughes –Odgers is a Western Australian artist and author known for his innovative illustrative style and public art.  Dazzling original illustrations from his new book On a Small Island are on display now at the State Library of Western Australia.

We spent some time hearing from Kyle about the inspiration and ideas behind his work. Here’s what he had to say…

Kyle Hughes-Odgers: Photo by Chad Peacock

Kyle Hughes-Odgers in his studio: Photo by Chad Peacock

1. Describe your book making process. Which comes first for you, the narrative, illustration, or the idea?

I had the initial idea for On a Small Island and I could visualise the flow of the artwork and some ideas I wanted to explore. I sketched all the artwork as a story board, then wrote the narrative to work with the images. After this the painting process started. For my next book the narrative has been very clear from the start so I have focused on developing this before starting any artwork. So I don’t seem to have a consistent process when approaching books.

2. You are known for your picture book illustrations and public art. How do you switch between extremes of scale and medium?

I love working across many different scales. I like the challenge of painting buildings and getting to spend time outside but I also love when I have time to be in the studio and work on paintings, drawings and children’s books. The variety keeps me slightly sane and it’s great to change my head space!

3. Your illustrations for On a Small Island include a lot of repetition, geometric shapes, and a variety of textures. How did this style evolve?

Very naturally – I think because I am constantly driven to make new work, the time spent exploring ideas and techniques has helped develop and progress my work to what it is today. I’m sure in another 5 -10 years it will have evolved again.

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On a Small Island exhibition. Photo: State Library of Western Australia

4. You grew up in and currently reside in Perth. Is there anything unique or iconic about the Western Australian environment that influences your work? 

There are many unique and iconic aspects to the Western Australian environment, but I’m not sure it has had a direct influence on my artwork. I’m inspired by many different parts of life

5. Would you describe On a Small Island as more universal or more autobiographical?

I wrote it with a universal reach in mind, but I do connect with it personally. I think the idea of being positive and productive to change your situation is something that most people can connect with.

6. In 2012 you collaborated with author Meg McKinlay to produce the book Ten Tiny Things. What was it like to be both author and illustrator with On a Small Island? How was it different or similar to working on Ten Tiny Things?

The artwork process was fairly similar in terms of planning and creating, the writing process was challenging compared to making artwork for Ten Tiny Things. I’m a very visual person and have never thought of myself as a writer so it was something I was really excited about but also cautious because it is very new ground for me.

7. Where do you find your creativity? Which artists and authors inspire you?

I’m really inspired by nature, creativity, human behavior and life! I draw/paint every single day and I really love it. My favourite illustrator of all time (at the moment) is Charley Harper.

A number of original illustrations from On a Small Island have been included in the State Library of Western Australia’s Children’s Literature Collection. The exhibition is on display in The Place on the Mezzanine floor, State Library of Western Australia and is open until 28 February. For more information visit our website.

On a Small Island exhibition. Photo: State Library of Western Australia

New Justice of the Peace Service Opens at State Library

Whenever you need a Justice of the Peace, think State Library of Western Australia.

A Justice of the Peace will be at the State Library every Monday to Friday from 10am to 2pm to do things such as witness and attest documents, certify copies of original documents, witness signing of documents such as Power of Attorney or Guardianship documents and divorce papers.

The service is free and no booking is required.

The State Library is working in partnership with the Department of the Attorney General to provide volunteer Justices of the Peace to provide the service.

The Justice of the Peace Signing Centre is located on the First Floor.

Picture a Story

Picture a Story exhibition

Picture a Story is an exhibition of original illustrations from Australian picture books from the 1970s to today.

Come and explore original artworks by Australia’s top illustrators such as Shaun Tan, Alison Lester, Leigh Hobbs, Graeme Base, Frané Lessac, Ron Brooks and more.

Be taken on a journey through the imaginative world of a picture book illustrator. Along the way you’ll see colourful images of the Australian landscape, scenes of magic and fantasy as well as charming depictions of everyday life.

Get to know some of Western Australia’s top illustrators. The work of home-grown favourites Frané Lessac, James Foley, Sean Avery, Matt Ottley and many more will be on display.

Picture books and the illustrations within them are for everyone, from young children to adults. There’s always something new to be discovered within a great picture book.

Enjoy exploring old worlds and new in Picture a Story.

When: 2 November 2013 – 27 February 2014
Where: The Gallery, Ground Floor and The Place, Mezzanine Floor, State Library of Western Australia
Entry: Entry is free. Open during library hours.

More information:

  • Join fun family activities on weekdays from 10.00am to 2.00pm.
  • Picture books will be on sale in the State Library Shop.

Is your city ‘walkable’?

Public Forum with Jeff Speck

In association with writingWA, Consult Australia and the Adelaide Festival of Ideas, the State Library of Western Australia presents:

The Walkability Mandate: A Public Forum with Jeff Speck

Renowned US author, city planner and architectural designer Jeff Speck will share his vision for smart growth, sustainable design, and walkability in a public forum on 16 October at the State Theatre Centre.

The evening will include the opportunity to get involved in an audience Q&A and to purchase copies of Jeff’s new book, Walkable City – How Downtown Can Save America One Step at a Time. For more information on Jeff Speck visit http://www.jeffspeck.com.

Jeff has dedicated his career to determining what makes cities thrive and he has it down to one key factor – walkability.

If we have learned one thing from the suburban experiment, it is that you can’t grow a green economy on bitumen.” – Jeff Speck

Venue: State Theatre Centre of Western Australia
Tickets: $45 (not inclusive of ticketing fee)
Cost includes complimentary drink and finger food on arrival.
Date: Wednesday 16 October 2013
Doors open: 6.00pm
Light refreshments: 6.00pm – 6.45pm
Public Forum: 6.45pm – 8.00pm

Buy your ticket now via Ticketek.

New exhibition: Majority Rules

At the opening ceremony of Majority Rules.

Visit our new exhibition in The Gallery on the Ground Floor of the State Library of Western Australia. 

How do you vote?

Discover how political parties and candidates persuade you to support them in the polls by exploring fascinating items from our collections: how-to-vote cards from 1904 to the present, newspapers covering Australian elections and much more.

A how-to-vote card from 1915

A how-to-vote card from 1915

Reflect on milestones in Australian election history, and discover some of the issues that have affected voting from the past to the present. Witness how campaigning has changed over time and decide what influences YOU at election time.

1996 X files inspired Labor Party campaign material

1996 X files inspired Labor Party campaign material

When: 8 July – 21 October 2013
Where: The Gallery, Ground Floor
Entry is FREE. Open during State Library hours.

Professor David Black and Professor Brian De Garis at the opening ceremony of Majority Rules.

Professor David Black and Professor Brian De Garis at the opening ceremony of Majority Rules.

Honouring our ANZACs

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.
– Laurence Binyon

To honour the ANZAC legacy, the State Library of Western Australia’s Data and Discovery team have curated a special Top 10 list of photos from our collection especially for ANZAC Day. By preserving and treasuring the social and documentary history of the ANZACs we ensure that they will never be forgotten.

Returning soldiers.

1. Returning soldiers.

1914 - C. Longmore and his brother H. Longmore, killed in action at Gallipoli.

2. c1914 – C. Longmore and his brother H. Longmore, killed in action at Gallipoli.

H. Phil Fry mounted on horse in front of the Sphinx in Egypt, 10th Light Horse, 1915.

3. H. Phil Fry mounted on horse in front of the Sphinx in Egypt, 10th Light Horse, 1915.

16th Battalion AIF, originals left after Gallipoli, 1915.

4. 16th Battalion AIF, originals left after Gallipoli, 1915.

ANZAC Day, Perth, 2007.

5. ANZAC Day, Perth, 2007.

Gordon Reid laying a wreath at Anzac Day ceremony , 1957.

6. Gordon Reid laying a wreath at Anzac Day ceremony , 1957.

Bunbury War Memorial, Anzac Day, 1956.

7. Bunbury War Memorial, Anzac Day, 1956.

Ex-servicemen marching in the 1930 ANZAC Day Parade, Perth.

8. Ex-servicemen marching in the 1930 ANZAC Day Parade, Perth.

Hugo Throssell, James Woods and Thomas (Jack) Axford, VC winners at the 1928 ANZAC Day ceremony .

9. Hugo Throssell, James Woods and Thomas (Jack) Axford, VC winners at the 1928 ANZAC Day ceremony .

Elevated view of crowd in the Esplanade Perth. Swan river and South Perth in the background, 1928.

10. Elevated view of crowd in the Esplanade Perth. Swan river and South Perth in the background, 1928.

Take3 author talks at the State Library – Wednesday 23 May

The State Library of Western Australian invites you to join us for this National Year of Reading event in celebration of Western Australian writing…

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Fans and supporters of the Western Australian writing community are invited to hear insights and stories from children’s author/illustrator James Foley, fiction writer Natasha Lester and travel writer Stephen Scourfield.

James Foley recently won the prestigious Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators’ 2012 Crystal Kite Award (along with author Norman Jorgensen) for their wonderful children’s book The Last Viking; a fun picture book about a boy who outwits local bullies by channelling his inner Viking.

Natasha Lester, who courageously left her career as Brand Manager for Maybelline Cosmetics to become an author, was rewarded for her efforts with the acclaimed TAG Hungerford Award for Fiction for her moving novel What is Left Over, After.

Stephen Scourfield, author and Travel Editor for The West Australian, has impressed readers with his new work, Unaccountable Hours, which evokes landscapes of Cottesloe and theSwanRiver,Perth;Cremona,Italy; and the Little Sandy Desert, Western Australia.

Books by each author will be available for purchase and signing on the night.

This celebratory event complements the State Library’s current exhibition; Write On!, which features profiles of WA authors and illustrators as well as original manuscripts, illustrations and research material of selected works. Write On! is on display in the ground floor gallery space adjacent to the Theatre, so can be viewed on the evening.

This National Year of Reading event is a fantastic opportunity to celebrate and get inspired by the diversity of Western Australian writing.

  • WHEN: Wednesday 23 May 2012. 6:00pm for wine and cheese, event begins at 6:30pm
  • WHERE: State Library Theatre, State Library ofWestern Australia
  • COST: FREE
  • RSVP: Please note that as capacity is limited, reservations are essential. Please call 9427 3111 to reserve your place.

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National Volunteer Week

It’s National Volunteer Week and I would like to take this opportunity to thank the approximately 100 volunteers who contribute their time, effort, talents and good humour to assist at the State Library.

This year’s theme for NVW is Volunteers Everyone Counts, so I thought I’d give an overview of who our volunteers are:

Officially the youngest is 15, unofficially seven (she volunteered with her aunt for the Better Beginnings Carnivale). The oldest is 85.

They speak Persian, Croatian, Bosnian, Serbian, German, Cantonese, Mandarin, Korean, Hungarian, Italian, French, Indonesian, Spanish and, no doubt, more.

One has been volunteering here for 25 years, three started last week.

Their experiences are deep and varied. From our volunteers I can find someone who will write and analyse public policy, manager databases, team lead childcare centres, make great coffee, lead intercultural studies, teach computing courses, understand medical jargon, manage your investments, deliver a baby, take photos and archive them. We have zoologists, law students, post graduates, urban planners, union organisers, students of every level, library officers, library technicians and, yes, librarians.

They volunteer for a variety of reasons: to keep up their skills, to network, to gain experience and build CVs, for social interaction, to be around a wide range of people, for a sense of fulfilment, for professional development, to practice their English, to explore new career opportunities, to build applications for Masters and doctorates Degrees, to help the public, for the enjoyable environment, to watch films from the State Library collection, for exposure to WA history or a passion for family history.

They volunteer directly for the State Library, for the State Library Foundation and via the WA Genealogy Society.

Their time commitment may be sixteen hours a week (the maximum recommended) to once every three or four months for one of our events.

This week we celebrate them and their contribution. For the 2010-2011 financial year volunteers gave almost 8000 hours to the State Library. Because of them and their ‘value-adding’, our clients received increased service and greater access to our collections.

To our volunteers – thank you!

Help Promote Reading @ Love2Read Cafe

46% of Australia can’t read newspapers, follow a recipe, make sense of timetables, or understand the instructions on a medicine bottle.

On Saturday January 21st the Love2Read Cafe opens at the State Library of WA. For five weeks there will be an outdoor reading room with  free events and activities including giant scrabble, music gigs, yoga classes, chalk art, word games, baby rhymetime, family storytime, school holiday activities, author talks, book signings and more.

To help promote literacy and be part of this fun event volunteer at the Love2Read Cafe.

For more information, leave a response here or contact volunteers@slwa.wa.gov.au